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المحتوى المقدم من The Law School of America. يتم تحميل جميع محتويات البودكاست بما في ذلك الحلقات والرسومات وأوصاف البودكاست وتقديمها مباشرةً بواسطة The Law School of America أو شريك منصة البودكاست الخاص بهم. إذا كنت تعتقد أن شخصًا ما يستخدم عملك المحمي بحقوق الطبع والنشر دون إذنك، فيمكنك اتباع العملية الموضحة هنا https://ar.player.fm/legal.
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Evidence Law Made Easy: Introduction to Evidence

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Manage episode 400867712 series 3243553
المحتوى المقدم من The Law School of America. يتم تحميل جميع محتويات البودكاست بما في ذلك الحلقات والرسومات وأوصاف البودكاست وتقديمها مباشرةً بواسطة The Law School of America أو شريك منصة البودكاست الخاص بهم. إذا كنت تعتقد أن شخصًا ما يستخدم عملك المحمي بحقوق الطبع والنشر دون إذنك، فيمكنك اتباع العملية الموضحة هنا https://ar.player.fm/legal.

I. Introduction to Evidence

A. Purpose and Importance of Evidence Law.

Evidence law serves a foundational role in the legal process, ensuring that trials are conducted fairly and that decisions are based on reliable, relevant information. Its primary purposes are:

To Ascertain the Truth: Evidence law helps in uncovering the truth by allowing certain pieces of information to be presented in court while excluding others that are unreliable, irrelevant, or prejudicial.

To Ensure Fairness: By providing clear rules for what evidence can be considered, evidence law aims to create a level playing field for all parties in a legal dispute.

To Enhance Efficiency: Evidence rules streamline the legal process by preventing the introduction of evidence that would waste time or distract from the main issues of the case.

To Protect Rights: Specific rules of evidence are designed to safeguard constitutional and statutory rights, such as the right against self-incrimination and the right to confront witnesses.

B. Sources of Evidence Law

Evidence law in the United States is primarily derived from two sources:

Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE): The FRE governs proceedings in the federal courts and serves as a model for many states. They were enacted to bring uniformity to federal evidence law and are regularly updated to address new legal challenges, including those arising from technological advancements.

State Evidence Codes: Each state has its own set of evidence rules, which may closely follow the FRE or diverge based on local legal traditions and needs. State supreme courts and legislatures are responsible for creating and modifying these rules.

In addition to these codified rules, common law principles still influence evidence law, especially in areas not fully covered by the FRE or state codes.

C. Types of Evidence.

Evidence can be classified into several types, each with specific rules governing its use:

Direct Evidence: Directly proves a fact without needing inference, such as eyewitness testimony that a person was seen at a crime scene.

Circumstantial Evidence: Requires inference to connect it to a conclusion of fact. For example, finding a suspect's fingerprints at a crime scene does not directly prove they committed the crime but requires an inference.

Real Evidence: Tangible items that are directly involved in the case at hand, such as a weapon used in a crime.

Demonstrative Evidence: Evidence created for trial to demonstrate or illustrate a testimony or a fact, such as charts, maps, diagrams, and models.

Digital Evidence: Information stored or transmitted in digital form that is relevant to the case. This includes emails, digital photographs, text messages, and information stored on electronic devices.

D. Overview of the Admissibility of Evidence

The admissibility of evidence is governed by a set of criteria designed to ensure that only relevant, reliable, and fair evidence is presented to the trier of fact (judge or jury). Key considerations include:

Relevance: Evidence must be relevant to be admissible, meaning it must make a fact in question more or less probable than it would be without the evidence.

Reliability: Certain types of evidence must meet specific reliability standards to be admissible, such as scientific evidence, which must be based on scientifically valid principles and methods.

Prejudice vs. Probative Value: Even if evidence is relevant, it may be excluded if its probative value is substantially outweighed by the risk of unfair prejudice, confusion of the issues, or misleading the jury.

Hearsay Rule: Hearsay, or statements made outside the courtroom offered for the truth of the matter asserted, is generally inadmissible unless it falls under one of the many exceptions to the hearsay rule.

--- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/law-school/support
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1043 حلقات

Artwork
iconمشاركة
 
Manage episode 400867712 series 3243553
المحتوى المقدم من The Law School of America. يتم تحميل جميع محتويات البودكاست بما في ذلك الحلقات والرسومات وأوصاف البودكاست وتقديمها مباشرةً بواسطة The Law School of America أو شريك منصة البودكاست الخاص بهم. إذا كنت تعتقد أن شخصًا ما يستخدم عملك المحمي بحقوق الطبع والنشر دون إذنك، فيمكنك اتباع العملية الموضحة هنا https://ar.player.fm/legal.

I. Introduction to Evidence

A. Purpose and Importance of Evidence Law.

Evidence law serves a foundational role in the legal process, ensuring that trials are conducted fairly and that decisions are based on reliable, relevant information. Its primary purposes are:

To Ascertain the Truth: Evidence law helps in uncovering the truth by allowing certain pieces of information to be presented in court while excluding others that are unreliable, irrelevant, or prejudicial.

To Ensure Fairness: By providing clear rules for what evidence can be considered, evidence law aims to create a level playing field for all parties in a legal dispute.

To Enhance Efficiency: Evidence rules streamline the legal process by preventing the introduction of evidence that would waste time or distract from the main issues of the case.

To Protect Rights: Specific rules of evidence are designed to safeguard constitutional and statutory rights, such as the right against self-incrimination and the right to confront witnesses.

B. Sources of Evidence Law

Evidence law in the United States is primarily derived from two sources:

Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE): The FRE governs proceedings in the federal courts and serves as a model for many states. They were enacted to bring uniformity to federal evidence law and are regularly updated to address new legal challenges, including those arising from technological advancements.

State Evidence Codes: Each state has its own set of evidence rules, which may closely follow the FRE or diverge based on local legal traditions and needs. State supreme courts and legislatures are responsible for creating and modifying these rules.

In addition to these codified rules, common law principles still influence evidence law, especially in areas not fully covered by the FRE or state codes.

C. Types of Evidence.

Evidence can be classified into several types, each with specific rules governing its use:

Direct Evidence: Directly proves a fact without needing inference, such as eyewitness testimony that a person was seen at a crime scene.

Circumstantial Evidence: Requires inference to connect it to a conclusion of fact. For example, finding a suspect's fingerprints at a crime scene does not directly prove they committed the crime but requires an inference.

Real Evidence: Tangible items that are directly involved in the case at hand, such as a weapon used in a crime.

Demonstrative Evidence: Evidence created for trial to demonstrate or illustrate a testimony or a fact, such as charts, maps, diagrams, and models.

Digital Evidence: Information stored or transmitted in digital form that is relevant to the case. This includes emails, digital photographs, text messages, and information stored on electronic devices.

D. Overview of the Admissibility of Evidence

The admissibility of evidence is governed by a set of criteria designed to ensure that only relevant, reliable, and fair evidence is presented to the trier of fact (judge or jury). Key considerations include:

Relevance: Evidence must be relevant to be admissible, meaning it must make a fact in question more or less probable than it would be without the evidence.

Reliability: Certain types of evidence must meet specific reliability standards to be admissible, such as scientific evidence, which must be based on scientifically valid principles and methods.

Prejudice vs. Probative Value: Even if evidence is relevant, it may be excluded if its probative value is substantially outweighed by the risk of unfair prejudice, confusion of the issues, or misleading the jury.

Hearsay Rule: Hearsay, or statements made outside the courtroom offered for the truth of the matter asserted, is generally inadmissible unless it falls under one of the many exceptions to the hearsay rule.

--- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/law-school/support
  continue reading

1043 حلقات

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