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What moves the continents, creates mountains, swallows up the sea floor, makes volcanoes erupt, triggers earthquakes, and imprints ancient climates into the rocks? Oliver Strimpel, a former astrophysicist and museum director asks leading researchers to divulge what they have discovered and how they did it. To learn more about the series, and see images that support the podcasts, go to geologybites.com. Instagram: @oliverstrimpel Twitter: @geology_bites Email: geologybitespodcast@gmail.com
 
This Physical Geology course is designed to give you an understanding of how the Earth works. Topics that we will discuss include what causes earthquakes, how old is the Earth and how we know this, how has the Earth evolved into the world that we see, and the nature, limitations, and benefits associated with extracting natural resources, such as petroleum
 
This Physical Geology course is designed to give you an understanding of how the Earth works. Topics that we will discuss include: what causes earthquakes, how old is the Earth and how we know this, how has the Earth evolved into the world that we see, and the nature, limitations, and benefits associated with extracting natural resources, such as petroleum. Most of the lectures are in the Lecture (audio) playlist below. Most of the files have been edited to eliminate long pauses that occur w ...
 
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Join us this week for our interview of Dr. Robin George Andrews. Robin George Andrews is a freelance science journalist based in London. His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Scientific American, Gizmodo, Atlas Obscura and elsewhere. He trained as a volcanologist, earning a doctorate in the subject, but the…
 
When plate tectonics was adopted in the 1960s and early '70s, researchers quickly mapped out plate movements. It seemed that plates moved as rigid caps about a pole on the Earth's surface. But since then, a lot of evidence has accumulated suggesting that plates are not, in fact, totally rigid. In fact, we can see them flex in response to stresses t…
 
Join us this week for our interview of Dr. Robin George Andrews. Robin George Andrews is a freelance science journalist based in London. His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Scientific American, Gizmodo, Atlas Obscura and elsewhere. He trained as a volcanologist, earning a doctorate in the subject, but the…
 
The air is clearing! In this episode, we discuss the geology of Great Smoky Mountain National Park. We've been neglectful of this region of the U.S. and it's time to do these amazing mountains justice. We begin by discussing why the Smokies are Smoky. It's an interesting and natural phenomenon that involves the immense pine forests. After we get th…
 
Life only emerged from water in the Ordovician. By that time, life had been thriving in oceans and lakes for billions of years. What did the colonization of the land look like, and how did it reshape the Earth’s surface? Neil Davies describes how we can decipher the stratigraphic sedimentary record to address these questions. Perhaps surprisingly, …
 
Today we have the great pleasure of talking about a very important topic, while interviewing one of the best and most interesting people we've had the pleasure of speaking with! Dr. Nedal Nassar is the Chief of the US Geological Survey’s Materials Flow Analysis Section, he has a PhD in Industrial Ecology from Yale and is a Leading member of the US …
 
Today we have the great pleasure of talking about a very important topic, while interviewing one of the best! Dr. Nedal Nassar is the Chief of the US Geological Survey’s Materials Flow Analysis Section, he has a PhD in Industrial Ecology from Yale and is a Leading member of the US National Science and Technology Council. In addition, he was awarded…
 
The asteroid Psyche is probably the most metal-rich body we have discovered. There are two, quite different, theories as to how it may have formed: Either it formed that way, or it originally had a more typical composition, but its rocky outer portion was blasted off during a major collision. To help determine which is most likely, NASA is sending …
 
Are you worried about Radon in your home? Here are a few valuable links to learn more about it and some resources to get a test - United States Environmental Protection Agency page United States Geological Survey FAQ United States Map of Radon Risk (get your home checked!) Today we talk about Radon! Radon is something you have probably heard of, bu…
 
Thanks to our UK listener Valeria for this excellent question! Valeria wondered what was going on with road collapses in the UK recently! Luckily, some experts have looked into this and wrote this recent blog post that proposes some ideas, and suggests further research is necessary. In this Geoshort, we discuss these options, as well as explain wha…
 
Join us as we interview Dr. Maya Wei-Haas who works as a science journalist for National Geographic. Dr. Wei-Haas has a PhD in geoscience, has done top-tier research. In our discussion, she explains why she decided to pivot and use her extensive background to write interesting articles about our amazing planet. This was not an easy decision for Dr.…
 
We hear about earthquakes in the Himalaya, especially when they claim lives and cause damage. And we understand that, broadly speaking, it is the continued northward movement of India ploughing into Tibet that causes these earthquakes. But where exactly do the earthquakes occur, how do they occur, and what determines how much damage they inflict? R…
 
Dr. Maya Wei-Haas has an impressive CV: See below. She has a PhD in Geoscience, but now works as a science journalist for National Geographic. Dr. Wei-Haas has had to overcome some major obstacles to become a professional journalist. Join us in this interesting discussion about a recent article on Daylight Saving Time. Science Journalist for Nation…
 
The Black Hills happens to be one of our favorite places. We thought it was the right time to talk about them as people are getting the itch for summer to arrive so we can play in the mountains. The Black Hills is the perfect area to orient a young family to a life of adventure and respect for the outdoors. You can't get into too much trouble here …
 
Join us as we interview science writer Steve Olson about his book Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens. For his outstanding work on this book, he won the Washington State Book Award and was named one of the best nonfiction books of 2016 by Amazon. Steve is also the author of the book The Apocalypse Factory: Plutonium and the Making of the…
 
The fossil record of complex life goes back far beyond the Cambrian explosion, to as far back as 1,600 million years ago in the late Paleoproterozoic with the first appearance of eukaryotes. But these creatures only started to diversify much later, around 750 million years ago. What enabled this evolutionary change has been a puzzle, but one idea i…
 
Join us in a preview to our full interview with science writer Steve Olson! In this GeoShort, we cover the modern science of Mount St. Helens, a bit about Steve's writing career, and discuss the importance of geoscience! Tune in next week for the full interview. In the book, Steve writes about the forestry industry, the history of the National Fore…
 
Does the pull of a subducting slab drive plate motions? Or is it the upwellings of convection cells in the mantle? We now have a new way to shed light on this question. It's called seismic anisotropy, which is the spreading out of seismic waves according to their direction of polarization. This happens when the mantle through which the waves travel…
 
Join Jesse and Chris as we interview Christina (Tina) Neal. Tina has 38 years of experience as a volcanologist for the USGS. She is the Volcano Science Center Director and is in charge of all 5 of the U.S. volcano observatories. Yes, that's right - there are 5 volcano observatories in the U.S.: California Volcano Observatory, Cascade Volcano Observ…
 
There’s a lot of debate about the idea that the global changes brought about by humans define a new geological epoch, dubbed the Anthropocene. Should such an epoch be added to the official geological time scale? If so, what aspect or aspects of anthropogenic change should be used, and exactly where do we place the golden spike that will define the …
 
In this episode, Jesse and Chris follow up on the K-T Extinction episode from last week. Why is Iridium so important in this story? Our show notes summary is below. Why is Iridium identified in these layers? Well, it’s higher in meteorites - but not really high. Why is it higher in meteorites though? It’s not actually high in meteorites, it’s low i…
 
Subduction zones are a fundamental aspect of plate tectonics, yet we still don't really understand how subduction initiates. It's a tough problem because as oceanic plates move away from a mid-ocean spreading center and cool, they get stiffer and should become more and more resistant to bending and sinking down into the mantle. But recent work sugg…
 
Join Jesse and Chris as we explore the hypothesis that an asteroid ended the Cretaceous AND the age of the reptiles. It's a very compelling scientific story of discovery. This has been hotly debated back and forth for a long long time, with consensus being reached only recently (since I was in graduate school) Other options include a massive volcan…
 
Chris and Jesse are recording this intro face to face in Michigan! We had a lot of fun actually recording together rather than from 600 miles apart. Join us in our final Re-release series on water. Show notes are below: This week we tackle a big question: why is the ocean so salty? Spoiler alert: it's because of the hard water you may have running …
 
New rock types emerge during the history of the Earth. For example, the silica-rich felsic rocks such as granite that characterize continental crust, accumulated during the course of Earth history. Granite only forms in certain specific tectonic settings, such as above subduction zones and when lower crustal rocks melt in mountain belts. But what a…
 
Join us as we interrupt our water series re-release to talk about a major current event - the eruption of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano in Tonga. It was a huge eruption in the South Pacific from a very active volcano. Its had some smaller eruptions in the last few months, but Saturday morning took the lid off. In fact, some instrumented Cascade…
 
Jesse and Chris are recording face to face in Michigan. Join us as we follow the water issues theme in our re-release series. Show notes below: We liked talking about dams so much we did it again! Join our discussion on streams, how the normally operate, and how dams disrupt the way that streams function. We highlight a few things in this episode, …
 
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