Native American عمومي
[search 0]
أكثر
تنزيل التطبيق!
show episodes
 
Wisdom is the next step in gaining knowledge. And with that, the Native Learning Center has created the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast. Hoporenkv (Hopo-thlee-in-ka) is the Creek word for “wisdom”. Hoporenkv Native American Podcast is the audio podcast from the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center to provide short and focused information on various Tribal housing and community development topics and subject matter related to Tribal housing and NAHASDA in shorter formats than ...
  continue reading
 
Native Opinion is a unique Indigenous culture education Radio show & podcast from an American Indian perspective on current affairs. The Hosts of this show are Michael Kickingbear, an enrolled member of the Mashantucket Pequot tribal nation of Connecticut and David GreyOwl, of the Echoda Eastern Band of Cherokee nation of Alabama. Together they present Indigenous views on American history, politics, the environment, and culture. This show is open to all people, and its main focus is to provi ...
  continue reading
 
The presented readings are featured with permission from Pastor Terry Wildman. Pastor Wildman is passionate about sharing the Gospel with Native Americans, in a culturally relevant way. Learn more about his vision at rainsongmusic.net and firstnationsversion.com. Native American Ministries Sunday (NAMS) reminds us of the contributions made by Native Americans to our society. Our generosity supports Native American outreach within annual conferences and across the United States and provides s ...
  continue reading
 
All around the country, many Native families are not whole. Whether their loved one is missing or murdered, many questions remain unanswered. This podcast will review several cases in the Northwestern region of the country, speak to family members of these victims, and examine some other factors that affect this ongoing problem.
  continue reading
 
The Native American Flute Music podcast is hosted by Bill Webb. Bill Webb is a composer, performer and singer of original music featuring Native American flute and world instruments. The Native American Flute Podcast includes music from dozens of his published albums from the first release, 'Native American Flute' in 2003 to 'Medicine' released in 2017. New albums will be played on the weekly podcasts as they are released along with the many previous albums. Native American Flute guest artis ...
  continue reading
 
History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
  continue reading
 
This podcast was developed as part of an elementary-level Clark County School District Teaching American History Grant. The three-year grant will fund six modules per year with each module focusing on a different era of American history and a different pedagogical theme. This podcast focuses on Native Americans of the Colonial Era and Technology Integration in Elementary Schools. Participants in the grant are third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers in Clark County (the greater Las Vegas area ...
  continue reading
 
Loading …
show series
 
The names of Red Cloud, Sitting Bull, and Crazy Horse are often readily recognized among many Americans. Yet the longer, dynamic history of the Lakota - a history from which these three famous figures were created - remains largely untold. In Lakota America: A New History of Indigenous Power (Yale, 2019), historian Pekka Hämäläinen, author of The C…
  continue reading
 
Release Date: 07.17.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “From the Rez to the Rec Center: A Passionate Seminole Fitness Specialist Shares Her Story” Special Guest: Courtney Osceola (Seminole Tribe of Florida) Recreation Fitness Specialist Seminole Tribe of Florida Recreation Episode Description: This week, we sit down with Courtney Osceola, Semi…
  continue reading
 
In thos episode of Native Opinion: * Biden/Trump Debate Coverage... What the ?!?!?!? * Judge Orders Rail Operator to Pay $400 Million to Tribe for Trespassing * House Subcommittee Considers Bills to Expand Tribal Land Trust Authority * Israel's Netanyahu blames Biden for withholding weapons. US officials say that's not the whole story * Oklahoma's …
  continue reading
 
America’s waterways were once the superhighways of travel and communication. Coursing through a central line across the landscape, with tributaries connecting the South to the Great Plains and the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River meant wealth, knowledge, and power for those who could master it. In Masters of the Middle Waters: Indian Nations and …
  continue reading
 
In Tip of the Spear: Land, Labor, and US Settler Militarism in Guåhan, 1944–1962 (Cornell University Press, 2023), Dr. Alfred Peredo Flores argues that the US occupation of the island of Guåhan (Guam), one of the most heavily militarised islands in the western Pacific Ocean, was enabled by a process of settler militarism. During World War II and th…
  continue reading
 
Release Date: 07.03.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “Meet Native American Bank: Creating Economic Independence, Development, and Sustainability” Special Guest: Veronica Lane (Navajo) Vice President, Marketing Director Native American Bank, N.A Episode Description: Join us as we sit down with Veronica Lane, Member of the Navajo Nation and Vi…
  continue reading
 
Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, teachers, administrators, and policymakers fashioned a system of industrial education that attempted to transform Black and Indigenous peoples and land. This form of teaching—what Bayley J. Marquez names plantation pedagogy—was built on the claim that slavery and land dispossession are fundamentall…
  continue reading
 
Between the mid-19th century and the start of the twentieth century, the Northern Paiute people of the Great Basin went from a self-sufficient tribe well-adapted to living on the harsh desert homelands, to a people singled out by the Native activist Henry Roe Cloud for their dire social and economic position. The story of how this happened is told …
  continue reading
 
Drawing on literary texts, conversion manuals, and colonial correspondence from sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spain and Peru, Forms of Relation: Composing Kinship in Colonial Spanish America (University of Virginia, 2023) shows the importance of textual, religious, and bureaucratic ties to struggles over colonial governance and identities. Dr.…
  continue reading
 
Episode Description: It is rare in America to see a wealthy, white male convicted of a Felony crime. But that rarity disappeared recently for Donald Trump. Jurors convicted Trump on 34 counts of falsification of business records in the first degree, which is a felony in New York. Trump was a resident of New York most of his life, and generated weal…
  continue reading
 
Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “In Honor of National Indigenous Peoples Day: Seminole Adults on Climate Change” Special Guests: Krystle Bowers (Seminole Tribe of Florida) Wilson Bowers (Seminole Tribe of Florida) Courtney Osceola (Seminole Tribe of Florida) Episode Description: This episode features a powerful conversation between three adult m…
  continue reading
 
In this sweeping new history, esteemed University of North Carolina historian Kathleen DuVal makes the case for the ongoing, ancient, and dynamic history of Native nationhood as a critical component of global history. In Native Nations: A Millennium in North America (Random House, 2024), DuVal covers a thousand years of continental history, buildin…
  continue reading
 
Scholars working in archaeology, education, history, geography, and politics tell a nuanced story about the people and dynamics that reshaped this region and determined who would control it. The Ohio Valley possesses some of the most resource-rich terrain in the world. Its settlement by humans was thus consequential not only for shaping the geograp…
  continue reading
 
Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “Get Your Hands Dirty: Dig into Gardening for National Gardening Week” Special Guest: Krystle Bowers (Seminole Tribe of Florida) Climate Resiliency Policy Coordinator Environmental Protection Office Seminole Tribe of Florida Episode Description: Join us as we celebrate National Gardening Week with a Native America…
  continue reading
 
Release Date:05.29.2024Hoporenkv Native American Podcast:In honor of National Small Business Month- “Made By Justine O: A Seminole Woman's Small Business Journey”Special Guest:Justine Osceola (Seminole Tribe of Florida)Owner: Made By Justine OEpisode Description:This week on the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast, we're thrilled to chat with Justine…
  continue reading
 
Release Date: 05.22.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: In honor of National Small Business Month- “She Breaks Barriers: Indigenous Women in the Business of Tech, Defense, and Logistics” Special Guests: Louisa Brown, CEO (Enrolled member of the Comanche Nation) Natuv, Inc. Board Chair of Directors Natuv Way Foundation Sonya Nevaquaya (Comanche/…
  continue reading
 
Edited by Benjamin Bryce and David Sheinin, Race and Transnationalism in the Americas (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021), highlights the importance of transnational forces in shaping the concept of race and understanding of national belonging across the Americas, from the late nineteenth century to the present times. The book also examines how …
  continue reading
 
Ever since Hamas attacked Israel, United States Federal Government has sworn to Support Israel’s stance of “it’s right to defend itself by continuing to fund them. But the killing of over 20,000 Palestinians of all ages and genders makes us believe this is genocide. Indigenous people of Turtle Island know all too well what genocide is. We have been…
  continue reading
 
Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month- “Healing Our Circles: Mental Health First Aid for Indigenous Youth” Special Guest: Cortney Yarholar, LMSW (Mvskoke Creek, Sac & Fox, Otoe, Pawnee) CEO of Evergreen Training & Development, LLC Episode Description: Our ancestors spoke of balance and connection to the spirit…
  continue reading
 
Historians of the American South have come to consider the mechanization and consolidation of cotton farming—the “Southern enclosure movement”—to be a watershed event in the region’s history. In the decades after World War II, this transition pushed innumerable sharecroppers, tenant farmers, and smallholders off the land, redistributing territory a…
  continue reading
 
Release Date: 04.25.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “In Honor of International Financial Independence Awareness Day: Building a Strong Financial Future for Your Family and Tribal Community” Special Guest: Chantay Moore, MBA (Navajo / African American) Director Native American Financial Literacy Services Investment Advisor Representative Tra…
  continue reading
 
How do bureaucratic documents create and reproduce a state’s capacity to see? What kinds of worlds do documents help create? Further, how might such documentary practices and settler colonial ways of seeing be refused? Settler Colonial Ways of Seeing: Documentation, Administration, and the Interventions of Indigenous Art (Fordham University Press, …
  continue reading
 
The past several decades have seen a massive shift in debates over who owns and has the right to tell Native American history and stories. For centuries, non-Native actors have collected, stolen, sequestered, and gained value from Native stories and documents, human remains, and sacred objects. However, thanks to the work of Native activists, Nativ…
  continue reading
 
Recognition Politics: Indigenous Rights and Ethnic Conflict in the Andes (Cambridge University Press, 2023) by Dr. Lorenza B. Fontana is a pioneering work that explores a new wave of widely overlooked conflicts that have emerged across the Andean region, coinciding with the implementation of internationally acclaimed indigenous rights. Why are grou…
  continue reading
 
In 1845 an expedition led by Sir John Franklin vanished in the Canadian Arctic. The enduring obsession with the Franklin mystery, and in particular Inuit information about its fate, is partly due to the ways in which information was circulated in these imperial spaces. Arctic Circles and Imperial Knowledge: The Franklin Family, Indigenous Intermedi…
  continue reading
 
Bringing into dialogue the fields of social history, Andean ethnography, and postcolonial theory, The Lettered Indian: Race, Nation, and Indigenous Education in Twentieth-Century Bolivia (Duke University Press, 2024) by Dr. Brooke Larson maps the moral dilemmas and political stakes involved in the protracted struggle over Indian literacy and school…
  continue reading
 
From Black Hawk helicopters to the exclamation "Geronimo" used by paratroopers jumping from airplanes, words and images referring to Indians have been indelibly linked with US warfare. In Indian Wars Everywhere: Colonial Violence and the Shadow Doctrines of Empire (U California Press, 2023), Stefan Aune shows how these and other recurrent reference…
  continue reading
 
The birchbark canoe is among the most remarkable Indigenous technologies in North America, facilitating mobility throughout the watery world of the Great Lakes region and its borderlands. In Muddy Ground: Native Peoples, Chicago's Portage, and the Transformation of a Continent (UNC Press, 2023), Texas Tech University historian John William Nelson a…
  continue reading
 
The history of Native people and the National Park Service in the United States is fraught. Dispossession, cultural insensitivity, and outright erasure characterize the long relationship that the NPS has with Indigenous groups. But change is possible, as Drs. Christina Hill, Matthew Hill, and Brooke Neely adeptly demonstrate in National Parks, Nati…
  continue reading
 
The Overland Trail into the American West is one of the most culturally recognizable symbols of the American past: white covered wagons traversing the plains, filled with heroic pioneers embodying the nation's manifest destiny. In American Burial Ground: A New History of the Overland Trail (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2023), University of Nev…
  continue reading
 
In his book, Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal(University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Dr. Gregory D. Smithers effectively articulates the complex history of Native Southerners. Smithers conveys the history of Native Southerners through numerous historical eras while properly reinterpreting popular misconceptions about the…
  continue reading
 
Stories of Our Living Ephemera: Storytelling Methodologies in the Archives of the Cherokee National Seminaries, 1846-1907 (Utah State University Press, 2023) recovers the history of the Cherokee National Seminaries from scattered archives and colonized research practices by critically weaving together pedagogy and archival artifacts with Cherokee t…
  continue reading
 
For western colonists in the early American backcountry, disputes often ended in bloodshed and death. Making the Frontier Man: Violence, White Manhood, and Authority in the Early Western Backcountry (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2023) by Dr. Matthew C. Ward examines early life and the origins of lawless behaviour in Pennsylvania, Virginia, Kentu…
  continue reading
 
In Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier (NYU Press, 2019), Ian Saxine, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Bridgewater State University, shows the dynamic relationship between Native and English systems of property on the turbulent edge of Britain’s empire, and how so many colonists came …
  continue reading
 
Today’s book is: Whiskey Tender: A Memoir (Harper, 2024), by Deborah Jackson Taffa, who was raised to believe that some sacrifices were necessary to achieve a better life. Her grandparents—citizens of the Quechan (Yuma) Nation and Laguna Pueblo tribe—were sent to Indian boarding schools run by white missionaries, while her parents were encouraged t…
  continue reading
 
“Is America an Empire?” is a popular question for pundits and historians, likely because it sets off such a provocative debate. All too often, however, people use empire simply because the United States is a hegemon, ignoring the country’s imperial traits to focus simply on its power. Dr. Daniel Immerwahr’s book How to Hide an Empire: The History o…
  continue reading
 
A gripping account of the violence and turmoil that engulfed England’s fledgling colonies and the crucial role played by Native Americans in determining the future of North America. In 1675, eastern North America descended into chaos. Virginia exploded into civil war, as rebel colonists decried the corruption of planter oligarchs and massacred alli…
  continue reading
 
Food is at the center of everything, writes University of Washington professor of American Indian Studies Charlotte Coté. In A Drum in One Hand, A Sockeye in the Other: Stories of Indigenous Food Sovereignty from the Northwest Coast (U Washington Press, 2022), Coté shares stories from her own experience growing up and living in the Pacific Northwes…
  continue reading
 
Cynthia Sylvester's The Half-White Album (University of New Mexico Press 2023) is a collection of stories, flash fiction, and poems revolving around the journey of a travelling band, The Covers. The stories are songs on the album, beginning with “Live at the House of Towers,” about a woman’s memories of her mother and home. The story of Shima (and …
  continue reading
 
In Amazonian Cosmopolitans: Navigating a Shamanic Cosmos, Shifting Indigenous Policies, and Other Modern Projects (U Nebraska Press, 2022), Suzanne Oakdale focuses on the autobiographical accounts of two Brazilian Indigenous leaders, Prepori and Sabino, Kawaiwete men whose lives spanned the twentieth century, when Amazonia increasingly became the c…
  continue reading
 
In Reckoning with Restorative Justice Hawaii Women's Prison Writing (Duke University Press, 2023), Dr. Leanne Trapedo Sims explores the experiences of women incarcerated at the Women’s Community Correctional Center, the only women’s prison in Hawaii. Adopting a decolonial and pro-abolitionist lens, she focuses mainly on women’s participation in the…
  continue reading
 
Scott Gac's Born in Blood: Violence and the Making of America (Cambridge UP, 2023) investigates one of history's most violent undertakings: The United States of America. People the world over consider violence in the United States as measurably different than that which troubles the rest of the globe, citing reasons including gun culture, the Ameri…
  continue reading
 
Release Date: 01.17.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “A Day in the Life of a Resident Services Department” Special Guests: • Christine De Los Santos, Resident Services Manager Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority • Montana Wise, Resident Services Specialist Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority • Maddi Ferranti, Resident Services Spec…
  continue reading
 
By putting the Midwest at the center of Vast Early America, University of Illinois historian Robert Morrissey reconfigures the power dynamics in the story of North America during the era of colonialism. In his award-winning People of the Ecotone: Environment and Indigenous Power at the Center of Early America (U Washington Press, 2022), Morrissey t…
  continue reading
 
In The Tame and the Wild: People and Animals after 1492 (Harvard University Press, 2024), Dr. Marcy Norton offers a dramatic new interpretation of the encounter between Europe and the Americas that reveals the crucial role of animals in the shaping of the modern world. When the men and women of the island of Guanahani first made contact with Christ…
  continue reading
 
Paul Radin was one of the founding generation of American cultural anthropologists: A student of Franz Boas, and famed ethnographer of the Winnebago. Yet little is known about Radin's life. A leftist who was persecuted by the FBI and who lived for several years outside of the United States, and a bohemian who couldn't keep an academic job, there ar…
  continue reading
 
Release Date: 01.03.2024 Hoporenkv Native American Podcast: “An Update on the Exciting Things Happening with the Youth Police Initiative” Special Guests: Jay Paris Director of Prevention & Early Prevention Programs North American Family Institute Special Projects Youth Police Initiative Julie Barrot De Brito Director of Operations Youth Police Init…
  continue reading
 
In 1570's New Kingdom of Granada (modern Colombia), a new generation of mestizo (half-Spanish, half-indigenous) men sought positions of increasing power in the colony's two largest cities. In response, Spanish nativist factions zealously attacked them as unequal and unqualified, unleashing an intense political battle that lasted almost two decades.…
  continue reading
 
Laura Briggs’s Taking Children: A History of American Terror (University of California Press 2020) is a forceful and captivating book that readers won’t be able to put down, and that listeners from all sort of backgrounds will definitely want to hear more about. Weaving together histories of Black communities (in the US and the Americas more broadl…
  continue reading
 
Loading …

دليل مرجعي سريع