Chemistry عمومي
[search 0]
أكثر

تنزيل التطبيق!

show episodes
 
C
Clinical Chemistry Podcast

1
Clinical Chemistry Podcast

American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
أسبوعيا
 
This free monthly podcast is offered by Clinical Chemistry. Clinical Chemistry is the leading forum for peer-reviewed, original research on innovative practices in today's clinical laboratory. In addition to being the most cited journal in the field, Clinical Chemistry has the highest Impact Factor (7.292 in 2019) among journals of clinical chemistry, clinical (or anatomic) pathology, analytical chemistry, and the subspecialties, such as transfusion medicine and clinical microbiology.
 
Chemistry is everywhere, and involves everything. But how did chemistry get to be what it is? I'm Steve Cohen, a chemist and writer, bringing you The History of Chemistry. This podcast explores the development of chemistry from prehistoric times to the present, including the people and societies who made chemistry what it is today. The History of Chemistry is for you, whether you hated chemistry in high school, or got a PhD in inorganic chemistry. We'll explore how chemistry affected art, mu ...
 
Helping you understand chemistry topics from A-Level and Advanced Higher. If you want to demystify chemistry, yearn for a simpler explanation and want to hear all the tips that will help you at exam time you're at the right place. I'm a chemistry tutor who is used to explaining chemistry in simpler terms, and I love to use an analogy to help with the understanding. Each episode tackles a topic, explaining it as simply as possible - well it is chemistry! The end of episode summary will make s ...
 
Learn Chemistry with Chemistry Notes Info at https://www.ChemistryNotesInfo.com. ChemistryNotesInfo.Com: Your Chemistry Tutor for Chemistry Study. Innovative Online Education Classes for 9, 10, 11, 12, Degree Courses, BSc, MSc. You can also Learn Topics like Spectroscopy, Physical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Science, College Chemistry. With this Chemistry Podcast you also learn Science Chemistry Terminology, Science Quiz, Chemistry Test, Experiments, Basic to Advance Chem
 
Loading …
show series
 
Ernest Rutherford discovered the basic structure of the atom. Then Max von Laue suggested diffracting x rays through crystalline layers and showed that atoms have a particular arrangement in crystals. Henry Moseley found a relationship between scattered x rays off elements and the positive charge in their nucleus, thus explaining the Periodic Table…
 
Bonus Episode: Question and Response 35 In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about pressure, eicosane, clouds, chemistry analogies, coffee, and baking. Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. Want to start your own podcast? Use Transistor and you'll have the best podcast platf…
 
In this episode: Molecular Formula Displayed Formula Structural Formula Skeletal Formula Want to know more, or support the show? Become a Patreon supporter of the podcast and get more from each episode patreon.com/chemistrymadesimple Check out the Chemistry Made Simple academyبقلم Matthew Macariou
 
Replacing gas cars with electric ones is a main pillar of plans to fight climate change. But the lithium-ion batteries used in electric cars come with a cost. Communities near the Salar de Atacama in Chile, where about a quarter of the world’s lithium is extracted from salty aquifers, say mining companies pose a serious threat to the local environm…
 
This week’s guest is dedicated to accelerating the American Cancer Society’s (ACS) mission. Alice Lin Pomponio joins the show to discuss how the BrightEdge Fund accelerates the ACS’ goal to reduce cancer mortality, end pain and suffering, and advance health equity. Plus, she shares her love of a hit Broadway musical.…
 
Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen made an earth-shattering discovery for chemistry and atoms in 1895: He discovered x rays. Then, soon after, Henri Becquerel took the idea of x rays a step further and made another, equally earth-shattering discovery for chemistry and atoms: radioactivity. The Curies figured out which known elements were radioactive. Rutherfor…
 
#144 Cars are complicated, there's lots of parts that do lots of things most of us will probably never understand it all. Well we can at least tackle one of those mysteries today. You've probably heard of something called a catalytic converter, right? And you've probably heard that it's important. Well that's true! But why? What does it do, why is …
 
We finally reach the discovery of electrons. The path starts with experiments on electricity in small vacuum vessels and vacuum pumps, improved by Heinrich Geissler, further improved by William Crookes, and then proving that their mysterious cathode rays were matter, not light, responding to electric and magnetic fields and possessing a mass, as J.…
 
In the 19th century, the centuries-old dependence on gunpowder for war began to change with Christian Schönbein's invention of guncotton. Then Sobrero invented the frightening nitroglycerin. We learn about Alfred Nobel's dealings with nitroglycerin and his efforts to improve its stability. We also hear about his will, founding the Nobel Prizes. The…
 
#057 Rebroadcast So we all know what we think of when we hear the word "alcohol," but what if that's not really the whole picture? There's actually many kinds of alcohol, most of which we cannot drink. So what's up with all those alcohols? What makes them different? What makes them similar enough to all be called alcohol? Let's find out. Like the s…
 
In this episode: What is organic chemistry? Importance of carbon - carbon and carbon - hydrogen bonds Different structure types in organic chemistry SIngle, double and triple bonds Want to know more, or support the show? Become a Patreon supporter of the podcast and get more from each episode patreon.com/chemistrymadesimple Check out the Chemistry …
 
We examine industrial inorganic chemistry of the 18th and 19th centuries, including sodium carbonate, focusing on the Leblanc Process and its replacement, the Solvay method. We look at production of the number one chemical in the world, sulfuric acid. We discuss the superphosphate process for fertilizer, and the invention of the match. Steel was a …
 
#143 For many of us, gasoline is just another everyday thing. It's essential, but we don't give it much thought. But how does it work? What is it made up of? Why are there different "grades" or "types" of gasoline? Let's start it up. goode.coffee Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podcast.
 
We look at the synthetic dye industry of the 1700s and 1800s, starting with Johann Diesbach, who invented Prussian blue in around 1706. Peter Woulfe found picric acid, a brilliant yellow compound, to be an effective dye for silk and wool in 1771. We hear the words of Dr. Jim Brazell, Professor Emeritus of English at The College of New Jersey, on ea…
 
Bonus Episode: Question and Response 34 In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about nail polish, tattoos, viscosity, humidity, life updates, and more! Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. Want to start your own podcast? Use Transistor and you'll have the best podcast platfor…
 
Marcus Sawyerr, Founder & CEO of EQ Community, rejoins the show, but a lot has changed since the last time we spoke, like his mission to accelerate diversity and inclusion. And some things have remained the same, like his appreciation of JAY-Z.بقلم Real Chemistry
 
In this episode we review 19th-century photochemistry, particularly photography, as well as chain reactions catalyzed by light. We finish up with boiling-point elevation, the last of the "colligative properties." With these aspects of physical chemistry, 19th-century physical chemistry gelled into a full chemical field, and the journal Zeitschrift …
 
#142 So a couple weeks ago we talked about how tattoos are permanent. But what if you don't want your tattoo to be permanent any more? You won't get any judgement from us. So how can tattoo removal work, when tattoos are designed specifically to stay in our skin indefinitely? Let's find out. Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show goin…
 
Josiah Gibbs revolutionized physical chemistry with his mathematics of thermodynamics and chemical equilibria, but published in an obscure journal few read. Wilhelm Ostward explained catalysis with his idea of an intermediate. Einstein figured out the cause of Brownian motion, and gave sufficient proof of atoms and molecules that all scientists acc…
 
#012 Rebroadcast This week Melissa and Jam continue in the category of "sticky" things by exploring how geckos stick to walls. How do they do it? Is it magic? Is it like spider-man? Is it intermolecular forces? Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a podcast.
 
The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution explains the behavior of gases nicely, and went well with the Ideal Gas Law of Clapeyton, until van der Waals modified the Ideal Gas Law a bit. We learn about absolute temperature and Lord Kelvin. Van 't Hoff connects the gas laws to osmotic pressure and ionic solutions. We hear of Raoult's Law and freezing-point …
 
We begin to examine 19th-century physical chemistry with thermodynamics. We hear of Rudolf Clausius and the two Laws of Thermodynamics, as well as entropy. There is Hess's Law, and Berthelot's calorimeter. We hear how Alexander Williamson started the field of chemical kinetics. Waage and Guldberg propose the Law of Mass Action, which tells us what …
 
#141 Tattoos go back centuries across many cultures, and yet their chemistry is still an absolute mystery to most of us. How do tattoos work? What is the ink made of? How does the ink stay in our skin indefinitely? Why don't our bodies get rid of it? Let's do this. Like the show? Buy us a coffee to help keep our show going AND free. How to start a …
 
We learn about the development of spectroscopy by Bunsen and Kirchhoff, and its ramifications, like remote sensing of materials--including heavenly bodies. We also learn about new elements discovered by spectroscopy, which boosted Mendeleev's periodic table and earned him accolades. Mendeleev, however, also predicted elements that don't exist, and …
 
Bonus Episode: Question and Response 33 In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam do something a little different. Because they're needing to record quite a bit ahead of time, this Q&R couldn't be about episodes that haven't come out yet, so they recorded a long-awaited sequel to their ice-breaker questions episode from last year. Like the sho…
 
Inventor, trailblazer and one of the 100 most influential people in the world, according to TIME Magazine, Mary Lou Jepsen, Ph.D., joins the show. She shares how her company, Openwater, is changing the game in neurotherapeutics and why she'd want a record player on a deserted island. Learn more about this incredible work via Dr. Jepsen’s Life Itsel…
 
In this episode: What is a dipole moment van der Waals forces Dipole-Dipole forces Hydrogen Bonding - including the specific requirements for this type of bond Relative level of attraction of these types of forces Want to know more, or support the show? Become a Patreon supporter of the podcast and get more from each episode patreon.com/chemistryma…
 
The problem of the large and growing variety of elements perplexed chemists, who attempted to bring order to the chaos. We learn about Döbereiner's triads, Pettenkofer and Dumas's correlations of multiples of atomic weights, Newlands's Law of Octaves, and Chancourtois's Telluric Screw. Kekulé's Karlsruhe conference brought order to some chemical ch…
 
Loading …

دليل مرجعي سريع

حقوق الطبع والنشر 2022 | خريطة الموقع | سياسة الخصوصية | شروط الخدمة
Google login Twitter login Classic login